I am always inspired by the legendary designer Axel Vervoodt.  His style is pure, primitive and embodies designs from ancient times to today. I take so much insprition from his work.  

A wonderful book, “Axel Vervoordt: The Story of a Style” describes his style—” Using beautiful and rare objects as raw material Axel Vervoordt began his career as an art and antiques dealer in the late 1960s, when he meticulously renovated a narrow street with sixteen of the oldest houses in Antwerp. In 1986, his company moved to a castle near Antwerp. Axel Vervoordt’s company grew rapidly in this castle and he became a major collector and decorator. The foundation of Vervoordt’s style is his commitment to making the past a relevant part of today’s design. By juxtaposing different works of art, gathered throughout space and time, a spontaneous dialogue between them is revealed, creating a new dimension for the future. Axel Vervoordt transcends the roles of decorator and collector. He understands the power of objects to conjure up an entirely new atmosphere and knows exactly where to place them to transform the space. This gorgeous book will be an inspiration to anyone interested in a home that is elegant and personal without being ostentatious or superfluous.

This bit of information comes from www.Axel-Vorvoordt.com”

“He is the Regarded as one of the most original and adventurous collectors and dealers of our time, Axel Vervoordt rightly considers himself an eclectic collector and dealer, who treasures the timeless and disdains the trendy. Vervoordt’s taste spans centuries, continents and economic strata, and his profound knowledge of this history of fine and applied arts has led him to create spaces in which his juxtaposition of objects from vastly different eras and cultures makes a strong and impressive statement on present and future interior taste. These juxtapositions should inspire contemplation and thus mental liberty.Vervoordt cites three main strands of influence in his work. The first is that of contemporary and oriental art and arte povera, which to him signifies the importance of a life of meditation, empty space, a love and respect of nature and of human existence. The second is architecture, which represents proportion, balance and harmony, such as one might find in an 18th century library. The third strand is the baroque, either gilded and courtly, or more. “

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